Christopher Duggan – Nutrition and Global Health and Population at Harvard University

Christopher Duggan is a professor in the departments of Nutrition and Global Health and Population at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He focuses on four primary areas of study: nutritional management for acute and persistent diarrhea; definition of biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction; efforts to prevent diarrhea and respiratory infections using micronutrients; and “general aspects” of energy and protein metabolism in catabolic diseases. That’s right — he’s a smart cookie, and his work saves lives. Our man at Harvard has a B.A. from Dartmouth College, an M.D. from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and an M.P.H from the Harvard University School of Public Health.

Chris Duggan is a Footballer?

Chris Duggan is a footballer (that’s soccer player for the Americans in the audience) of Scottish and Australian extraction. Born in Perth, Western Australia, he began his playing career at Queen’s Park, in Glasgow, before moving to Hamilton Academical, in South Lanarkshire. After a brief stint playing in the United States, he returned to Scotland and notched an impressive showing at Irvine Meadow. His adult professional career formally began in 2013; he played for Partick Thistle for three years (much of it spent on loan to other clubs) and then bounced around a bit before landing at East Fife in 2019.

Christopher Duggan – Happy to Assist Clients!

Christopher R. Duggan is a senior attorney in Dorsey’s Tax Group, where he advises clients on strategies to minimize exposure to sales and use, business and occupation, state and local income, and excise taxes. Mr. Duggan’s clients include international retailers and e-commerce companies that do business in hundreds of separate tax jurisdictions. It’s a complicated business, but someone has to do it!

Christopher R. Duggan is also a pro when it comes to federal tax issues, including credits like the New Markets Tax Credit. And he’s only too happy to assist clients with audits, appeals, and matters related to Section 1031 exchanges.

Stay Safe, Chris Duggan!

Chris Duggan has one of the more exciting — and dangerous — jobs in our clan. He’s a bona fide Hollywood stuntman who appears to specialize in slam-bang action work. Major film credits include Get Carter (2000), Dreamcatcher (2003) and First Wave (1998), according to his IMDB page, but he’s busier than that limited filmography lets on. Mr. Duggan wasn’t available to comment on what the life of a professional stuntperson actually involves, but we can safely assume that it’s far more exciting than whatever you or I happen to do for a living. To our man in Hollywood, we say: Stay safe, Mr. Duggan!

Chris Duggan – British Illustrator and Portraitist

Chris Duggan is a British illustrator and portraitist whose works have appeared in numerous publications over the decades: Punch, Vogue, Time Out, The Financial Times, The European, and more. Full-length books to his credit include “Conned!( a History of Scams, 

Frauds and Scandals)” and “Hic! The Entire History of Wine” — which sounds like a delightful, intoxicating read, if you’ll pardon the pun.

Mr. Duggan’s work is apparently impressive enough to earn notice from some of Britain’s most prestigious cultural institutions. His illustrations, according to his website, have been featured in the collections of the Bank of England Museum, the Cartoon Museum, and the British Cartoon Archive, among others.

Your Initials Are More Popular Than You Think: 6 Notable People With the Initials “K.D.”

We don’t know much about you, fellow reader. That’s the beauty of the Internet — it’s basically anonymous. 

However, there’s one bit of information we can fairly surmise about many of the visitors to this website: Their initials begin with “K” and end with “D.”  Maybe your name is Kris Duggan? Or Katherine Doherty? Or Kip Dillon? We have no idea.

But if you are indeed a “K.D.,” you’re in surprisingly good company. These six notable people, some of whom are quite famous entirely on their own, also share those initials.

Kevin Durant

Kevin Durant is a legendary American basketball player. Long part of the almost-champions Oklahoma City Thunder squad, he’s now an integral piece of the Golden State Warriors superteam. Born in Washington, D.C., and blessed with an outrageous vertical matched only by an even more outrageous reach, “K.D.” is already a lock for the basketball hall of fame.

Kevin Duckworth

Kevin Duckworth was another basketball-playing K.D. of an earlier generation. Sadly, he left us far too soon, dying at age 44 of complications of heart failure. His career was largely spent with the Portland Trail Blazers, and though he never ascended to the heights of contemporaries like Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson, he left behind a respectable basketball legacy. After retiring, he remained in Portland and did extensive charitable work in his adopted hometown.

Karen Duffy

Karen Duffy is an American actress whose turn as one of People Magazine’s “most beautiful people” (1993) was just the opening act in an illustrious career that was just as notable for what Duffy accomplished off-screen as on-. A certified hospital chaplain and sufferer of a rare, painful disease, she’s a prominent advocate for chronic pain patients.

Kitty Dukakis

Katherine “Kitty” Dukakis is the former first lady of Massachusetts and wife of former Massachusetts governor (and unsuccessful U.S. presidential candidate) Michael Dukakis. Dukakis has long been a prominent advocate for those suffering from substance abuse disorder and other mental health issues.

Kim Deal

A key member of groundbreaking act Pixies and a founding member of the Breeders, Kim Deal was among the most prominent women in the U.S. alternative rock scene of the 1980s and 1990s. Fun fact: Kim Deal has a twin sister named Kelley — another member of the K.D. clan.

Kirk Douglas

Last but not least, a posthumous mention for legendary actor Kirk Douglas of Spartacus fame. Douglas appeared in dozens of critically acclaimed films over the course of eight or nine decades in show business (depends how you count “decades”) and remained in public life almost until his death in early 2020 at the remarkable age of 103. Like some of the other K.D.s on this list, Douglas used a pseudonym; the son of Russian Jewish immigrants, his birth name was Issur Danielovitch. 

That’s it — 10 of the best-known K.D.s around today. Is your favorite K.D. on the list, or did we miss an important name?

To Shorten or Not to Shorten? What to Expect When You’re Expecting (To Name Your New Child)

First of all, congratulations! You’re about to welcome a new child into the world.

That’s a big deal. As you’re well aware, for parents, a new child is a one-way ticket to a life forever changed. 

One of the many, many things you’re going to need to think about between now and whenever your child arrives is what to call the baby.

You probably have some names picked out already. Maybe a couple sex-specific names each, or names specific to just one sex if you know what it’s going to be. 

There’s a pretty good chance that those names are formal. Or, if you’d prefer not to think of them that way, that they’re longer versions of more commonly used names. Commonly shortened names, you might say.

If that’s the case, you might ask, why not just start your kid off with the shorter name on their birth certificate? They can always go by the longer version, if they really want, or even legally change their name when they get old enough. But if the alternative is choosing “Kris Duggan” over “Christopher Duggan” or “Kat Simmons” over “Katherine Simmons” from age six onward, what’s the point of Christopher or Katherine to begin with?

Fair question. Let’s walk through it.

The Advantages of a Longer/Full Name for Your Child

Call it the “traditionalist” case. You might want to choose a longer or “full” name for your child because:

 

  • It’s a family name. Sure, most people go by “Chris” these days. But what if you want to honor your child’s grandfather Christopher Duggan with a full-on “Christopher”? You should have that right.
  • It sounds better in professional settings. You might think traditional names look better on a business card or letterhead. That’s a valid opinion.
  • It has a nice ring to it. Longer names tend to be more sonorous than monosyllabic nicknames or shortenings. Your mileage may vary, though.
  • It has a history. If you’re big on the history of names, you have every right to choose one whose pedigree stretches back centuries (or longer).

 

The Upsides of Shortening From the Start

Here’s the “revisionist” case for choosing a shorter name or nickname for your kid right from the beginning:

 

  • It rolls off the tongue better. Shorter names and common nicknames are faster and easier to say than longer names, especially family names no longer in common use (or subject to mispronunciation).
  • It’s more friendly-sounding. Short names are more casual and friendly-sounding. Again, that might be a good or bad thing in your book, but it is what it is.
  • It’s less likely to need a nickname. Short names might not be nickname-proof, but they’re definitely less likely to require one.

 

It’s Your Call

Okay, let’s step back for a moment. We’ve covered many of the pros and cons of shortening (or not shortening!) your new child’s name. This is the point where we recenter the conversation on those who’ll actually be making the decision — that’s you, your partner (if you have one), and eventually, your child. 

Ultimately, whether you shorten or decline to shorten your kid’s name is your call. You have the support of your fellow Kris Duggans in either case.

Kris, Christopher, Chris and More: Where Did These Names Come From, Anyway?

We’re willing to bet you’ve idly wondered where your name comes from more than once. Perhaps you’re truly fascinated by the history of your name, whether it’s Kris Duggan or a close variation thereof, or something entirely different.

Because we don’t have all day, we’ll limit this discussion to the history of the name “Kris” and close variations, such as Chris, Christopher, Kristian, Christian, Christina, and more. As it turns out — and perhaps you already suspected this — they have more in common than you might imagine.

Origins of the Name Christopher 

The name Christopher dates back to Greece in the early Common Era. The original Greek name was Christophoros, which translates literally to “bearer of Christ.” 

Clearly, “Christophers” weren’t around in the days of the ancient Greeks, whose heyday predates the time of Christ by several centuries. By the time the name “Christophoros” rolled around, Greece was in the process of “Christianizing” — that is, immersed in a cultural exchange that would eventually push out the old polytheistic structure and replace it with monotheistic Christianity. Saint Christopher is widely credited with popularizing the name, but there was no guarantee that it would spread at the time.

And Christian? Well, That Makes Sense

Even more so than Christopher, “Christian” is quite clearly bound up in the Christian religious tradition. Originating nearly simultaneously in various parts of Europe (though apparently with the greatest density in northern Europe and Scandinavia) during the late Middle Ages, this name was just as it sounded: a signifier that the bearer was a member of the Christian faith. It should be noted that “Kristian,” a common variation to this day, was the spelling of choice in Scandinavian precincts.

Common Variations of Christopher and Christian (As in “Chris Duggan”)

Part of what makes the study of names so interesting is accounting for the linguistic variations in common names. “Christophoros” remains uncommon beyond the Greek-speaking regions, of course, but variations on it exist in virtually every corner of the Western world. So, depending on where you’re from, you might know your fellow “Christophoroses” as:

  • Christoph (Germany)
  • Cristofor (Romania)
  • Christophe (France)
  • Kristof (Dutch)
  • Kristoffer (Sweden, Norway, Denmark)

The same goes “Christian” (often spelled “Kristian,” as we noted) and “Christina”:

  • Cristian and Cristina (Spain, Italy, Portugal, and other countries)
  • Cristiona (Ireland)
  • Kristina (Sweden)

And, of course, these names often exist in shortened form. (See: Kris Duggan.) In some countries, Cristinas or Christinas are more commonly known as Cris or Cristi; ditto for Christophers and Kristophers (Chris and Kris, respectively).

Names Are Funny Things

Well, that just about wraps our discussion of the origins of the name(s) that may or may not have brought you to this website today. We hope you’ve learned a thing or two about where your own name comes from. If you’re not a member of the extended Kris/Chris/Cris family, we encourage you to learn more about your own name’s history and meaning. You might discover something you never knew about yourself.

The Destiny in Our Names — A Retrospective

In 2008, The New York Times’ Stephanie Rosenbloom wrote a moving piece about the long-distance bonds forged by people sharing the same first and last names. Among other examples, Rosenbloom mentions:

  • The writer Angela Shelton, whose 2008 book “Finding Angela Shelton” chronicles Shelton’s encounters with 40 other Angela Sheltons.
  • The illustrator Keri Smith, who had completed six drawings of people with her exact name when Rosenbloom went to press. 
  • The pediatric oncologist Sam Blackman, who kept close tabs on fellow Sam Blackmans through periodic Google searches.
  • A huge cohort Mohammed Hassans seeking to break the world record for the largest gathering of individuals with the same name. (The article does not disclose whether their endeavor was successful.)

Rosenbloom describes these efforts and encounters with a whimsical flourish, but the thrust of her article is much more serious and thought provoking. Namely: Do our very names influence the paths we take through life? This question is particularly relevant for the Kris Duggans reading this — those who’ve found their way here for reasons they can’t fully explain.

More Than a Familiar Combination of Characters

For those not predisposed to superstition, this question feels decidedly off-the-wall. But Rosenbloom cites a number of contemporary data points suggesting that, indeed, our names do have some real-world effects — both tangible and psychological.

One of the bases for these effects may be the name-letter effect theory, which Rosenbloom describes as “maintain[ing] that people like the letters in their own names (particularly their initials) better than other letters of the alphabet.”

Recent evidence for the name-letter effect is compelling. 

For instance: Data culled from public records indicates that people with surnames beginning with “B” were more likely to contribute to candidate George W. Bush during the 2000 presidential election, while people with surnames beginning with “G” were more likely to contribute to candidate Albert Gore. To be clear, there is no indication that people bearing “B” surnames are more likely to vote Republican than people whose last names begin with “G”.

There’s more. According to Rosenbloom, studies led by research psychologist Dr. Brett Pelham found that:

  • “Johnsons are more likely to wed Johnsons,”
  • “[W]omen named Virginia are more likely to live in (and move to) Virginia,” and
  • “[P]eople whose surname is Lane tend to have addresses that include the word ‘lane,’ not ‘street.’”

No word yet on any research into the proclivities of those named Kris Duggan, but here’s to hoping it’s coming.

Comfort in Familiarity?

The name-letter effect also has strong circumstantial evidence behind it, too. 

Rosenbloom recounts the story of a Virginia-based graphic novel editor named Jason Rodriguez with a strong affinity — and perhaps a twinge of jealousy as well — for an identically named stuntman whose credits included “Pirates of the Caribbean.”

Later, she tells the tale of Tim Connor, a photo editor who wrote that he “felt in some way I already knew” a fellow Tim Connor glimpsed in a photograph.

Is there a scientific basis for our attraction to those who share our names? We may never know for sure. But the prospect is sufficiently compelling to warrant further inquiry.

Have Your Say

Has your name (first, last, middle, or all three) affected your choices in life? Do you believe you’d be the same person if you had a different name?

Common Names Are Easy to Remember, But They Can Be Confusing Too

We’ll leave it up to the jury to decide whether “Kris Duggan” counts as a common name. In its ancestral Ireland, that may be the case, but K. Duggan isn’t among the world’s most common first-last name combinations.

That’s okay. Fellow Kris Duggans are in good company, and plenty of it. They don’t need a surfeit of hangers-on.

Likelier than not, we’ve welcomed readers with names more common than Kris Duggan. Perhaps you’re among them. According to a 2014 study by Ancestry.com, the 10 most common name combinations in the United States featured just a handful of surnames. In order of popularity, they were:

  • James Smith
  • Michael Smith
  • Robert Smith
  • Maria Garcia
  • David Smith
  • Maria Rodriguez
  • Mary Smith
  • Maria Hernandez
  • Maria Martinez
  • James Johnson

It’s no surprise that “Smith” and “Rodriguez” are among the most common last names in the United States, nor that “James” and “Maria” are among the most common first. 

In other parts of the world, and in other times, the mix varies. Variations on “Mohammed” almost certainly comprise the most common male first name on the planet; “Fatima” is a very common female name. 

So, whether your name is James Smith or Maria Martinez or Fatima Hassan, you know better than any Kris Duggan what it’s like to exist in a very large cohort of identically named individuals.

It follows that you know how to stand out from that crowd — if that’s your preference. You’ve probably tried out one or two of these strategies:

 

  • Make a Subtle Change to the Name’s Spelling or Pronunciation: Change a letter, change the meaning. That’s the hope, anyway. Whether it works out that way is anyone’s guess. But going from “John” to “Johnny” is a start.
  • Go By a Less Common Middle Name: Your middle name most likely isn’t as common as your first. Adopt it as your “given” name and see how things feel. This is an especially potent tactic for those with “family” middle names borrowed from obscure, long-dead relatives with obscure, long-dead names.
  • Adopt a Nickname: It works for athletes and media personalities. Why wouldn’t it work for you, whoever you happen to be? Just make sure it’s a nickname that’s utterable in polite company.
  • Use Your Middle Initial (Or Two, If You’re So Fortunate): “Mary H. Johnson” is better than “Mary Johnson,” and “Mary H. T. Johnson” is better than both. 
  • Add a Suffix: Are you a “junior”? A “the third?” Insufferable as it may appear at first, you know what you must do to distinguish yourself once and for all.

 

What’s In a Name, Anyway?

These strategies could distinguish you from all the other Maria Garcias or James Johnsons in the world. But you don’t need them to distinguish your identity from theirs. 

To put it another way, you must never forget that you’re a unique individual, quite unlike anyone else who’s ever lived or ever will. Your name is just that — a name. It’s what you do that matters most.

Do you have a plain vanilla name? Or is your moniker more memorable than your neighbor’s?